• ON3P Caylor 2011

      • Review by VD. on Oct 26, 2013 @ 6:37 PM
        • 1
      • Review:

        Dimensions: 148-120-140
        Radius: 27.4m
        Boots: Lange Super Blasters (120 Flex)
        Bindings: Rossignol Axial2 120 & Marker Baron, DIN at 11
        Mount: Reccomended (-3 from true center)
        Test Locations: Whistler, BC Interior, Sar Mountains Macedonia, Scotland
        Days: ~100

        When I first came over to Canada for the 11-12 season, I managed to convince myself I needed a true powder ski. As before even despite my best efforts I would still spend more times skiing patchy Scottish hills rather than proper mountains, and so I never really had a need for a twin rockered 120 underfoot ski like the Caylor. Since I was only going to be spending a season in BC I wasn't willing to invest in more than one pair of deeper snow skis, and so I was looking for a versatile ski, that could jib and charge.

        Having now spent the best part of two seasons on this ski (writing this 9th of March 2013), I can honestly say I have skied this in pretty much all of the conditions you would be breaking this ski out for. Including some you really wouldn't normally take them out to ski on, I have even turned up to race training on these. I'm going to talk about deeper snow here, these really handle any snow conditions exceptionally. Interior of BC blower was incredible on these skis, I wouldn't say the medium stiff flex was in any way detrimental to the experience. The medium stiff flex is most appreciated however when you skiing less than desirable deeper snow conditions, such as rain soaked stuff and the generally heavier snow you get in a maritime climate.

        The Caylors really like to stomp as do I, despite the pretty 'heavy rockering' the flex is supportive enough for backseat landings. The flex is also forgiving on those less than perfect switch landings, and this is really appreciated.

        Out of the box Caylors feel fairly heavy, and no denying they are a beefy ski, well in excess of 2000+grams. However they area plenty nimble on you feet, and in the air the swing weight feels well balanced. They been taken on day tours at first with a ridiculous Trekker set up and then with some Barons, and for day tours they served me fine. Lugging a ridiculously heavy set up uphill for 'security when hucking those cliffs' is all part of the fun as a teenager on the skin track, so why deny myself that?

        The Caylors can make a whole variety of turns from long GS turns right through to tight trees, and if you ever are carrying too much speed through a section, the generous tail rocker will always be enough to scrub speed. If these were my primary pow ski and I was living somewhere 'out west', I wouldn't feel the need to go rush and buy a tree ski the Caylors are perfectly adequate in tight spaces. Whilst the Caylors can charge, if you're an out and out big mountain ripper, who never/rarely skis and lands switch or you're a guy looking for a chargy pow ski, I wouldn't point you in the direction of the Caylors, the twin rockered design and almost symmetrical dimensions don't help the chargers cause. If you're looking for more of a charger from ON3P, I'd look into the 193 Cease and Desist, 191 Billy Goat, 191 Wrenegade, depending on what your requirements are.

        In cut up snow and crud which you inevitably get after that epic pow day. In chopped up the larger tip on the 2010-2011 model can sometimes get deflected, however this has been combated by tip and tail taper on the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 models. On everyday groomers the ski feels pretty nice, there is some flapping from the rockered tips and tails, however the stiffer flex keeps this to a minimum. My main issue with the Caylors on piste, is on 'icey' groomers due to the flat nature of it's camber profile, and their short running length. However one shouldn't consider this at all in the pre-purchase decision process and these aren't conditions you would be breaking the Caylor out for. Maybe you'd encounter these on the way back to the lift after having just pillaged your secret spot, in which case the Caylors will do just fine, they wont carve like a GS ski, but the won't kill you either, which is more than you can say for quite a lot of other skis in the same category as the Caylor. So much so that I use these almost exclusively as my everyday ski now.

        These are an absolute bomber ski with incredible construction, I have one corshot from about 100 days of skiing, although I should have a lot more, many other skis would have been retired by now considering the amount of abuse the Caylors have been through. If you're looking for a deep day ski or even an everyday ski, you couldn't go wrong with the Caylors, they're an absolute blast and will serve you well.

        Ratings:
        • Terrain
          Park
          Pow
        • Design
          Clean
          Busy
        • Durability
          Fragile
          Durable
        • Weight
          Light
          Heavy
        • Style
          Uncool
          Cool
        • Flex
          Soft
          Stiff
        • Camber
          Cambered
          Rockered
        • Pop
          No Pop
          Poppy
        • Stability
          Jittery
          Stable
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    • Product Information
    • Name:
    • Caylor
    • Manufacturer:
    • ON3P
    • Year:
    • 2011
    • Gender:
    • Male
    • At A Glance
    • Terrain
    • Park
      Pow
    • Design
    • Clean
      Busy
    • Durability
    • Fragile
      Durable
    • Weight
    • Light
      Heavy
    • Style
    • Uncool
      Cool
    • Flex
    • Soft
      Stiff
    • Camber
    • Cambered
      Rockered
    • Pop
    • No Pop
      Poppy
    • Stability
    • Jittery
      Stable
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    • Review Ratings
       
       
      Score: 4